Munchery is proud to announce Marketplace, a haven for chef-recommended delectables and local specialties that belong in the hands of foodies everywhere. We work with our award-winning chefs to bring you products and brands that guarantee quality you can trust so you can effortlessly fill your pantry with premium essentials. We’re offering these items at prices you deserve, prices that make real ingredients an attainable part of everyone’s cooking arsenal.

Don’t just take our word for it, find out for yourself why our chefs hand-select each product by reading our Marketplace Blog Series, which highlights each item and its Munchery story.

 An Ancient Tradition

Gerard & Dominique Wild Coho Smoked Salmon

For as far back as we can look, salmon has been smoked as a means of preservation. The smoking process neutralizes bacteria activity by curing the fish, making it edible almost indefinitely. With the advent of refrigeration, however, smoking became a means of imparting new flavors. The taste of a smoked salmon depends on the process, which is very open to creativity. The wood variety, length of smoking-time, temperature of the smoke, and length/strength of the brine all heavily influence the flavor profile of the final product.

Different cultures have different techniques of making smoked salmon, styles that yield special textures and flavors. Northwestern Native American tribes smoked fillets of salmon until dry and jerky-like. Lox, a variation of smoked salmon, is a Nova Scotia tradition cured using a heavy salt brine and remains very fishy in taste and texture. In Scandinavia, the salmon is marinated in dill, sugar, and herbs, then lightly smoked for full-bodied flavor.

Then there’s the Northwest style, one of our personal favorites, which is hot-smoked, wonderfully moist and flaky, and rich with natural flavor.

Nothing Quite Like It

In 1990, acclaimed chefs Gerard Parrat and Dominque Place set out to find a smoked salmon in Seattle that met their sky-high standards. As famous as Seattle is for its fresh seafood, nothing quite had the quality they were looking for. Instead of continuing their search, they simply started making their own. Because both of chefs were European-trained, their natural intuition was to make a European-style smoked salmon. This quickly became their signature offering, and in a matter of years, premier hotels and restaurants worldwide were featuring the hard work of Gerard & Dominique.

In 1998, Gerard retired, leaving Dominique and his wife Andrée in charge of the burgeoning business. They shifted their focus, going from making the best smoked salmon in the Northwest to making the best Northwest-style smoked salmon anywhere. To this day, all their fish is harvested from the cold waters of the Pacific, hand-filleted, and prepared with extreme care.

Gerard & Dominique Wild Coho Smoked Salmon

 

Tasting Tips

Gerard & Dominique Wild Coho Smoked Salmon is wonderfully versatile

Like any premium item on our Marketplace, Gerard & Dominique Wild Coho Smoked Salmon is as delicious as it is versatile. Smoked over a blend of Northwest fruitwoods, the slightly fruity flavor is great when paired with dill, tangy capers, and red onions.

How our chefs like to use Gerard & Dominique Wild Coho Smoked Salmon:

  • For a breakfast treat, put some on a fresh bagel with cream cheese or mix into some scrambled eggs.
  • Lay thin slices over crostini or combine with caviar for an upscale appetizer.
  • Have a sushi night and roll the smoked salmon in seaweed with rice and diced cucumber.
  • Simply enjoy on its own.

Regardless of how you choose to use this expertly-smoked wild salmon, our award-winning chefs are sure that you will be delighted by it’s rich, balanced flavor.

Munchery members can purchase Gerard & Dominique Wild Coho Smoked Salmon today on our Marketplace!

Andrew Mitchell

Posted by Andrew Mitchell

Andrew Mitchell is a Copywriter at Munchery. He grew up in Helena, Montana and graduated in 2016 with an English and Creative Writing degree from Stanford University. Andrew loves goats, being lost, and toast.

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